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“I like to read” VS “I like reading”: A Comparison

“I like to read” VS “I like reading”: A Comparison

Often, sentences may be different, but they mean the same thing, it’s a matter of learning about what verbs take the ‘to-infinitive” clauses, and what verbs take an ‘-ing’ clauses. For example ‘hope’ and ‘expect’ take ‘to infinitive’: “I hope to wake up in time for my meeting.” “I expect to get good marks in my English exam as I worked hard for it.”

Moreover, after a few verbs in the case of ‘to infinitive’ an object follow, for example, ‘tell’, ‘advise’, or ‘ask’: “I asked them to repeat the answer.” “We advised him to eat healthy.” “I told her to have fun.”

Furthermore, verbs, like ‘enjoy’, ‘admit’, or ‘look forward to’ take the ‘-ing’ clause: “I enjoy being in nature.” ” I admit taking the bribe.” “I look forward to seeing you.” The verb ‘prevent’ is follows by an object + (from) + an ‘-ing’. “I prevented them from stealing an artwork.”

Verbs like begin, start, love, continue, or cease can take both, either the ‘to infinitive’ clause, or ‘-ing’ clause, and there aren’t differences in meaning between them: “I started to eat healthy.” “I started eating healthy.”

The difference between ‘I like to read’ and ‘I like reading’ is in clauses, ‘I like to read’ uses the ‘to infinitive‘ clause, while ‘I like reading’ uses the ‘-ing’ clause.

Moreover, when someone says “I like to read”, it’s implying that they read but not as often as you would think. When someone says, “I like reading”, it is implying that they read regularly.

“I like to read” also means that one likes to read books by a specific author, or magazines, for example, “I like to read Shakespeare.”

While “I like reading” means, that one likes to read for a purpose, for example, “I like reading because it helps me relax.”

Keep going for more information.

What is the difference between I like to read and I like reading?

a card that says hello
I like to read books!

The differences between “I like to read” and “I like reading” are several, “I like to read” is “to-infinitive”, while “I like reading” is a present participle.

Moreover, ‘I like to read’ also implies that one reads a specific material, for example, “I like to read thrillers.” Whereas “I like reading” implies that one reads for a purpose, for example, “I like reading to take my mind off work things.”

What’s the difference between Read, Read (red), and Reading?

Read, read (red), and reading, are different types of tenses, Read is present simple, read (red) is past simple, and reading is present continuous. Examples: “He reads a newspaper every day.” “She read (red) a newspaper yesterday.” “They are reading a newspaper.”

a bunch of books stacked on top of each other
There are three main tenses.

In order to differentiate between sentences, you should be familiar with tenses, and I have listed all the tenses with examples below.

There are three main tenses: past, present, and future, and every one of these tenses has four main aspects which are: simple, perfect, continuous (also called progressive), and perfect continuous.

TenseMeaningExample
Present simpleIt’s used when facts, generalizations, and truths are involved which aren’t affected by the passage of timeHe reads the newspaper every day
Past simpleIt’s used for events that were completed in the pastHe read (red) a newspaper yesterday
Future simpleIt’s used for events that will be finished in the futureHe will read the newspaper tomorrow
Present perfectIt’s used to describe the events that began in the past and are expected to continue.He has read (red) a newspaper
Past perfectIt’s used to describe the events that occurred before other events in the pastHe had read (red) yesterday’s newspapers before he switched to today’s newspaper
Future perfectIt’s used to describe the events that will be completed between now and a specific time in the futureHe will have read (red) several newspapers
by the end of this week
Present continuousIt’s used to describe the actions which are currently ongoing (often temporary)He is reading a newspaper
Past continuousIt’s used to describe the ongoing past events, often those events are in relation to the occurrence of another eventHe was reading a newspaper when his water bottle spilled
Future continuousIt’s used to describe the future events that are expected to continue over a certain period of timeHe will be reading ten newspapers next week
Present perfect continuousIt’s used to describe the events which started in the past and will continue into the present or were recently completedHe has been reading a newspaper all day, and now he needs to get some sleep
Past perfect continuousIt’s used to describe the events which began, continued, and finished in the pastHe had been reading a newspaper all day, and she needed to get some sleep
Future perfect continuousIt’s used to describe the events which will continue until a point in the futureHe will have been reading this newspaper for two hours when he gets some sleep
Different tenses

Learn more about the tenses through this video and have a frim garsp on tenses.

All tenses in 30 minutes

What does “To be read” mean?

“To be read” means that, to understand the true feeling of people just by looking at how they act, for example one can read someone if they are lying as they would be sweaty and will not be making eye contact.

There is a phrase that you may have heard of, ‘read (someone) like a book’, what it means is, to analyze and quickly understand someone.

Generally, reading a person means, taking a hard look at them and quickly knowing something about them. It’s basically a feeling that you get by observing how they behaves.

Here is a list of phrases of ‘read’ to improve your English.

  • Read for filth: Basically to scold.
  • Read the room: Understand thoughts and emotions of people who are present in a room.
  • Read between the lines: Infer a meaning which isn’t said explicitly.
  • Read the Riot Act: Scold someone in an extreme manner.
  • Don’t read like a robot: Don’t read without any expression.
  • Read in: Accept the input or data.
  • Read in: Give access to some classified information.
  • Read between the lines: To understand the reality or a hidden truth.
  • Read my lips: It’s used to emphasize an statemet.

What is another word for read?

books
“Read” has multiple synonyms.

There are other words for every single word, which means that there is another for “read” as well, let’s have a look at them.

  • Study: Give time and attention in order to gain knowledge of.
  • Flick through: Look quickly through a book, newspaper, magazine, etc
  • Interpret: Understand (an action, mood, or behavior) as having a specific meaning.
  • Understand: Perceive the meaning which is intended (words, a language, or a speaker).
  • Devour: Read in a quick and eager manner.
  • Scrutinize: Examine closely and thoroughly.
  • Scan: Look at it from every angle carefully to detect some feature.
  • Wade through: Read laboriously.
  • Peruse: Read something in a thorough or careful manner.

To Conclude

  • ‘I like to read’ uses the ‘to infinitive’ clause, while ‘I like reading’ uses the ‘-ing’ clause.
  • ‘I like to read’ means that one likes to read (books of an specific author, or magazines).
  • ‘I like reading” means, that one likes to read for a purpose.
  • Read is Present simple tense, read (red) is Past simple tense, and reading is Present continuous tense.
  • To read someone means, knowing something about them by looking at them.
  • There are other words to read, for example devour or scan.

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