Home Lifestyle Difference between the formula v=ed and v=w/q

Difference between the formula v=ed and v=w/q

by Logan

Based on Coulomb’s law of charge, in formula v=Ed, E is the electric field between both the plates, and d is the distance between the two plates. v=W/q, where ‘w’ is the work done to transport the particle from one location to another, v is the potential difference between both the plates, and q is the charge of the particle.

In v=w/q, we examine the charge at an infinite point and then compute the charge’s work. v=Ed, on the other hand, is concerned with capacitors, which store the charges of the particle as it passes between the plates. The difference is calculated by subtracting the voltage differential between the plates of a capacitor.

Is it v =- ed or v= ED?

The equation for calculating the electrical potential difference in a uniform field is simple: V = Ed. V is the potential difference in volts, E is the electric field intensity (in newtons per coulomb), and d is the distance between two places in this equation (in meters).

How is the charge directly proportional to the potential if v=w/q?

According to this equation, the effort put in to haul a unit charge across two points is equal to the difference in potential between the two places.

The phrase “charge is exactly proportional to potential” refers to the charge that generates the potential in the issue, not the charge that is impacted by it.

In brief, the meanings of ‘charge’ in the equation and statement differ; the first is the ‘victim,’ while the second is the ‘perpetrator,’ if you will.

Capacitors

What is the relationship between E and V?

For parallel conducting plates, the connection between V and E is E=V*d. A homogeneous electric field E, for example, is created by putting a potential difference (or voltage) V across two parallel metal plates.

What exactly is D in e v d?

While working on difficulties with basic parallel plate capacitors, You may come across the formula E = V/d, where E is the measure of the electric field between both the panels, V is the voltage differential between both the plates, and d is the plate gap.

How can I get V = W/Q?

W = F*d [Work done equals the product of force and distance]

Because E = V/r, F = QE = Q*V/r

W = QVr/r =QV

Rearranging

W/Q = V

Where W denotes work done, Q denotes charge, F denotes coulomb force, E denotes electric field, r denotes distance, and V denotes electric potential.

A video explanation for when and how to use the respective formulae.

What does it imply when I convert v/v to w/w?

Converting from one to the other might be difficult. To convert v/v to w/w, multiply the density of the solute by the density of the solution and divide by the density of the solution. Regrettably, the solution is a mixture, and the density varies with concentration. If the solution is VERY dilute, the density of the solvent can be assumed, but in general, a table of concentrative qualities is required. Tables for several typical water solutions may be found in the Handbook of Chemistry and Physics.

Conversions between w/w and w/v have the same issue.

V/V stands for volume per volume. In other words, the subject under consideration is a proportion of the volume of a constituent to the volume of the total. For example, 0.02 gallons of oil in a liter of gasoline is a 1/50 ratio, or 2% V/V.

W/W stands for weight per weight (or mass per mass). In other words, the substance under consideration is a ratio of the mass of a constituent to the mass of the total. For example, 240 kilograms of cement in 2400 kg of concrete is a 1/10 ratio, or 10% W/W.

Another option is W/V. For example, 240 kg of cement in 1 cubic meter of concrete. 240 kg/m3

What is the interaction between the E charge Q and the V potential difference?

We consider electric potential V (or simply potential, as electric is recognized) to be the energy per unit charge V=PEq V = PE q in order to have a quantitative measurement that is independent of the test charge.

What exactly is the distinction between positive and negative potential?

A positive electrostatic potential at a point indicates that a positive charge at that point has higher potential energy than the reference point.

A negative potential indicates that a positive charge at that position has lower potential energy.

What exactly is the potential difference dimensional formula?

The work is done when a coulomb of charge moves between two places in an electric circuit is defined as the voltage differential between the points. This equation may be used to compute the magnitude of a potential difference: V x W x Q V represents the potential difference in volts, V W represents the work done (energy transfer) in joules, J Q represents the charge in coulombs and C.

Heat capacity formulac=ΔQ/ΔT
Weight formulaW = mg  
Wave speed formulav=fλ
Atomic Mass formula  m = E / c2
Magnetic flux formulaΦB=BAcosθ
Formulas

What is the dimension formula for a potential gradient?

The potential gradient is defined as the rate of change in potential (energy) with the position.

For instance, If V(x) is potential, then the gradient on a V(x) vs x graph is the slope of the curve at any point x.

So the gradient is defined as a change in potential versus a change in position point.

[dV/dx] = [energy]/[length] = [M L2 T-2]/ [L] = [M L T-2] Dimension [dV/dx] = [energy]/[length] = [M L2 T-2] Dimension [dV/dx] = [energy]/[length] = [M L2 T-2] Dimension

= [push]

On the first side, its force should be as follows:

F = -dV/dx

capacitor

How to determine the dimensional formula of a potential V?

Electrostatics consists of

V = (work done)/Potential (charge)

Here, I’m thinking about a basic definition rather than a more theoretically correct definition.

Work done now equals force. displacement.

= mass accelerated. velocity. displacement

= mass (displacement) / (time)2 repositioning

So, in terms of the scope of the work completed,

= [M]×[L/T^2]×[L]

= [ML^2 T^(-2)].

Furthermore, charge = current ×time

So, in terms of charge dimension,

= [I]×[T]

[IT] =

As a result, the dimension of potential in electrostatics = [V] = [ML2 T(-2)].

/[IT]

= [ML2 I(-1) T(-3)]

Gravitation is defined by

V = (work done)/Potential (mass)

As a result, the dimension of potential in Gravitation = [V] = [ML2 T(-2)]

/[M]

= [L^2 T^(-2)].

Final thoughts

A voltage supplied between two conducting plates in a basic parallel-plate capacitor generates a homogeneous electric field between those plates. In a capacitor, the electric field intensity is proportional to the applied voltage and inversely proportional to the distance between the plates.
We define electric potential V (or simply potential, as electric is recognized) to be the potential energy per unit charge V=PEq V = PE q in order to have a physical quantity that is independent of the test charge.

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